Puiforcat de A à Z Rupture

Rupture

Permanent reinvention

R as in Rupture

A glass and metal vessel for fine wines? The House of Puiforcat has ushered in something of an oenological revolution, together with Enrico Bernardo, one of the world's top sommeliers, and design superstar Michael Anastassiades. This novel wine glass is intriguing, first and foremost for its architecture. Take the base: designed with no stem, the glass rests on a removable silver stand. Meanwhile, the conical bowl gives it a distinguished and highly original shape. 

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Watch the video

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Going beyond its unorthodox geometry, this glass completely upends tasting rituals: the stemless design makes for a more direct and sensual link between the wine and the person savoring it; likewise, the shape of the glass leads the wine to the mouth with a horizontal motion, allowing the aromas to spread and develop and offering lovers of fine wines unexpected and thrilling sensations. A break from tradition, perhaps, but also a whole new array of epicurean pleasures.  

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Cognac tumbler in sterling silver

Cognac tumbler in sterling silver

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The House of Puiforcat has quite a track record when it comes to boldness and unorthodox positions. It re-launched the fashion of sterling silver champagne tumblers, a royal legacy that had fallen into disuse. It has imagined futuristic collections in collaboration with contemporary designers, such as Patrick Jouin's Zermatt flatware and Gabriele Pezzini's high-tech kitchen knives. And lest we forget the master Jean Puiforcat, who in the 1920s and 30s brilliantly revived the Maison's style thanks to geometric Art Deco designs. 

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Three-tined fourks
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A few years earlier, the silversmith-cum-designer had already won acclaim by lampooning convention. In French kitchens, the four-tined fork was the unquestioned norm. Jean thus designed a three-tined utensil, opting for elegant lines over immemorial routines. But this silverware revolution can also be seen as a loving nod to the past: under Louis XIII, three-tined forks regularly graced noble tables. In the end, the House of Puiforcat may spark rebellion, but always at the service of the great history of arts of the table.

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